Bryan Police Department
     At the Top Of Ohio
        
304 West High Street
Bryan, Ohio 43506
(419) 633-6050

 

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April Is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month

 

 

 

On Tuesday April 7, 2015 Derek Beardsley started with the Bryan Police Department.

Shown being sworn by Mayor Johnson (on right) is is Derek Beradsley


Teen Driver Crashes

New research into crash videos of teen drivers has found significant evidence that distracted driving is likely much more serious a problem than previously known, according to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

The video analysis finds that distraction was a factor in nearly 6 out of 10 moderate-to-severe teen crashes, which is four times as many as official estimates based on police reports.

Researchers analyzed the six seconds leading up to a crash in nearly 1,700 videos of teen drivers taken from in-vehicle event recorders.

The results showed that distraction was a factor in 58 percent of all crashes studied, including 89 percent of road-departure crashes and 76 percent of rear-end crashes.

NHTSA previously has estimated that distraction is a factor in only 14 percent of all teen driver crashes.

“Access to crash videos has allowed us to better understand the moments leading up to a vehicle impact in a way that was previously impossible,” said Peter Kissinger, President and CEO of the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

“The in-depth analysis provides indisputable evidence that teen drivers are distracted in a much greater percentage of crashes than we previously realized.” 

The most common forms of distraction leading up to a crash by a teen driver included:

  • Interacting with one or more passengers: 15 percent of crashes
  • Cell phone use: 12 percent of crashes
  • Looking at something in the vehicle: 10 percent of crashes
  • Looking at something outside the vehicle: 9 percent of crashes 
  • Singing/moving to music: 8 percent of crashes
  • Grooming: 6 percent of crashes
  • Reaching for an object: 6 percent of crashes

“This research confirms that passengers and cell phones are the two most prevalent distractions for teen drivers involved in crashes,” said AAA Michigan Public Affairs Director Susan Hiltz. “The risk factors are compounded by the fact that young drivers have less experience behind the wheel. It’s vital that parents take an active role in educating their teens about distracted driving.  Coupled with strong graduated driver licensing and distracted driving laws, helping provide proper protection for teen drivers is a community-wide effort.”

AAA recommends that state laws prohibit cell phone use by teen drivers and restrict passengers to one non-family member for the first six months of driving.

Graduated driver licensing (GDL) laws allow new drivers to gain practical experience in a relatively safe environment by restricting their exposure to risky situations.
33 states have laws that prevent cell phone use for teens and 18 states have passenger restrictions meeting AAA’s recommendations.

AAA recommends that parents teach teens about the dangers of cell phone use and restrict passengers during the learning-to-drive process.  

Before parents begin practice driving with teens, they should create a parent-teen driving agreement that includes strict ground rules related to distraction. 

AAA offers a comprehensive driver education program, where teens can learn specifically how using a cell phone affects driving abilities and increases their crash risk.

For more information, visit TeenDriving.AAA.com.​

Teens have the highest crash rate of any group in the United States. About 963,000 drivers age 16-19 were involved in police-reported crashes in 2013, which is the most recent year of available data. These crashes resulted in 383,000 injuries and 2,865 deaths. The full research report and b-roll video of teen driver crashes is available on the Foundation’s website.

The Foundation partnered with researchers at the University of Iowa to conduct this study.


 

If you use Facebook, watch out for suspicious posts tagged with dozens of names. This new scam is called "malicious tagging," and it's tricking victims into downloading malware.   

How the Scam Works: You get a Facebook notification that a friend tagged you in a post. It appears to be a link to an "adult" video, and a dozen other friends are also tagged. Your friend would never knowingly post spam, so you figure the link must be safe. But when you click it, a pop up window appears. It says that you need to download a Flash player update before you can watch the video.

Don't do it! The file you are prompted to download isn't really an update, it's malware. In addition to opening you up to ID theft by scanning for personal and banking information, the malware also perpetuates the scam. It takes over your Facebook account, creates another fake video post and automatically tags a bunch of your friends. 

Protect Yourself From Social Media Scams: 

Take the following steps to protect yourself and others from scam links shared through Facebook, Twitter and other social media: 

Don't take the bait. Stay away from promotions of "exclusive," "shocking" or "sensational" footage. If it sounds too outlandish to be true, it is probably a scam. 

Be careful of shortened links. Scammers use link-shortening services to disguise malicious links. Don't fall for it. If you don't recognize the link destination, don't click.   

Don't trust your friends' taste online. It might not actually be them "liking" or sharing scam links to photos. Their account may have been hacked or compromised by malware.   

On Facebook, report scam posts and other suspicious activity by following these instructions. 


 Move Over Bryan Ohio Police

4511.213 Approaching stationary public safety vehicle displaying emergency light.

(A) The driver of a motor vehicle, upon approaching a stationary public safety vehicle, emergency vehicle, road service vehicle, vehicle used by the public utilities commission to conduct motor vehicle inspections in accordance with sections 4923.04 and 4923.06 of the Revised Code, or a highway maintenance vehicle that is displaying the appropriate visual signals by means of flashing, oscillating, or rotating lights, as prescribed in section 4513.17 of the Revised Code, shall do either of the following:

(1) If the driver of the motor vehicle is traveling on a highway that consists of at least two lanes that carry traffic in the same direction of travel as that of the driver's motor vehicle, the driver shall proceed with due caution and, if possible and with due regard to the road, weather, and traffic conditions, shall change lanes into a lane that is not adjacent to that of the stationary public safety vehicle, emergency vehicle, road service vehicle, vehicle used by the public utilities commission to conduct motor vehicle inspections in accordance with sections 4923.04 and 4923.06 of the Revised Code, or a highway maintenance vehicle.

(2) If the driver is not traveling on a highway of a type described in division (A)(1) of this section, or if the driver is traveling on a highway of that type but it is not possible to change lanes or if to do so would be unsafe, the driver shall proceed with due caution, reduce the speed of the motor vehicle, and maintain a safe speed for the road, weather, and traffic conditions.

(B) This section does not relieve the driver of a public safety vehicle, emergency vehicle, road service vehicle, vehicle used by the public utilities commission to conduct motor vehicle inspections in accordance with sections 4923.04 and 4923.06 of the Revised Code, or a highway maintenance vehicle from the duty to drive with due regard for the safety of all persons and property upon the highway.

(C) No person shall fail to drive a motor vehicle in compliance with division (A)(1) or (2) of this section when so required by division (A) of this section.

(D)

(1) Except as otherwise provided in this division, whoever violates this section is guilty of a minor misdemeanor. If, within one year of the offense, the offender previously has been convicted of or pleaded guilty to one predicate motor vehicle or traffic offense, whoever violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor of the fourth degree. If, within one year of the offense, the offender previously has been convicted of two or more predicate motor vehicle or traffic offenses, whoever violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor of the third degree.

(2) Notwithstanding section 2929.28 of the Revised Code, upon a finding that a person operated a motor vehicle in violation of division (C) of this section, the court, in addition to all other penalties provided by law, shall impose a fine of two times the usual amount imposed for the violation.

Amended by 130th General Assembly File No. 57, SB 137, §1, eff. 12/19/2013.

Effective Date: 01-01-2004; 2009 HB2 07-01-2009

Related Legislative Provision: See 130th General Assembly File No. 57, SB 137, §4.


 

Operation Lifesaver, Norfolk Southern

Look..... Listen.....Live

 

Matt Arnold Operation Lifesaver

Bryan Ohio PD Operation Lifesaver

Operation Lifesaver offers bicyclists six tips for safety near train tracks:

  1. CROSSING TRACKS ON A BICYCLE REQUIRES CAUTION AND EXTRA ATTENTION! Narrow wheels can get caught between the rails. If possible, walk - don't ride - across. Always cross at a 90-degree angle.
  2. USE ONLY DESIGNATED RAILROAD CROSSINGS. The only legal and safe place to cross railroad tracks is at a designated public crossing with a crossbuck, flashing red lights or a gate. Crossing at any other location is trespassing and illegal.
  3. TURN OFF MUSIC AND REMOVE EARPHONES AT ALL RAIL CROSSINGS. Music can be a deadly distraction near the tracks - preventing you from hearing an approaching train.
  4. WET TRAIN TRACKS CAN BE SLIPPERY. Dismount and walk your bike across the tracks.  Step over the tracks - not on them - to avoid slipping.
  5. WATCH OUT FOR THE SECOND TRAIN. Wait after the first train passes until you can see clearly in both directions.
  6. IF YOU SEE A TRAIN COMING, WAIT! Flashing lights or a lowering gate means a train is approaching. Do not proceed until the gates go completely up and the lights go off. It is illegal to go around lowered gates, whether on a bike, on foot or in a vehicle.

 

Cardboard 'Most Interesting Man' fails as carpool-lane ruse

This Monday, March 23, 2015 photo by Washington State Patrol Trooper Tony Brock shows a cardboard cutout of the "The Most Interesting Man In The World,"

A motorcycle trooper parked along Interstate 5 near Tacoma on Monday afternoon spotted a driver and a rather unusual "passenger" pass by him in the carpool lane. When the trooper stopped the car, he discovered the "passenger" was a cardboard cutout of the actor who portrays "The Most Interesting Man in the World" in Dos Equis beer ads.

The driver's response? "He's my best friend."

The Most Interesting Man was not confiscated, but the driver was told not to use him again.

Channeling the cardboard cutout, the State Patrol tweeted: "I don't always violate the HOV lane law ... but when I do, I get a $124 ticket."

 


Homeland Security Live Alert


 

2014 Traffic crashes for the City of Bryan

 

January

February March April

May

June July August September October November December
25 35 28 28 30 24 26 23 34 30 23 28
25 60 88 116 146 170 196 219 253 283 305 333

 

2015 Traffic crashes for the City Of Bryan 
Updated 4/14/2015

January

February March April

May

June July August September October November December
24 25 19 10                
24 49 68                  

 


 

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